Secure Web Browsers

Don't stay safe. Stay free.

Browser Recommendations For Desktops


Firefox.com is fast, reliable, open-source, and respects your privacy.

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Tor Browser is your choice if you need an extra layer of anonymity. It's a modified version of Firefox ESR, which comes with pre-installed privacy add-ons, encryption, and an advanced proxy.

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Browser Recommendations For iOS


DuckDuckGo Privacy Browser is an open-source web browser that has built-in ad and tracker blocking and utilizes ToS;DR to rate the privacy policies of the sites you visit.

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Firefox is fast, reliable, open-source, and respects your privacy. Firefox for iOS has an Enhanced Tracking Protection feature that uses a list provided by Disconnect to identify and block ad, social, and analytics trackers, as well as cryptominers and fingerprinters.

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Onion Browser is an open-source browser that lets you browse the web anonymously over the Tor network on iOS devices and is endorsed by the Tor Project. Warning: there are certain anonymity-related issues with Onion Browser due to iOS limitations.

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Browser Recommendations For Android


Firefox is fast, reliable, open-source, and respects your privacy.

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Bromite is a Chromium-based browser with privacy and security enhancements, built-in adblocking and DNS over HTTPS support; it includes patches from ungoogled-chromium and other privacy-focused projects.

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Tor Browser is your choice if you need an extra layer of anonymity. It's a modified version of Firefox ESR, which comes with pre-installed privacy add-ons, encryption, and an advanced proxy.

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We all use email, and we all use the Internet.

Email is one of the most powerful tools we now use daily. It allows us to send instant messages to friends, family and clients. In just a few clicks, we can send an email from our PC to someone we don't know quite easily.

In recent years many have begun to worry about the security of such communications as emails. The often Privacy Act of 2003 and the 2008 EU Data Protection directive have both added requirements for governments and businesses to follow in order to remove personal data from databases.

If you are concerned that your email may be archived and potentially used as government property, you can ensure that it is deleted permanently by using anti-spyware software and eliminating all traces of your presence from the databases.

Avoiding Ads

When you visit a website, be aware of any advertisements that may pop-up on your screen. Most sites have a privacy policy that visitors can find by traveling through a window at the top of the website. Read all of their policies before connecting to their website.

The above two steps will help you to minimize unwanted emails. If you even get a nasty email, make sure to take a look at the "Terms & Conditions" of the website. If any information is incorrectly provided, call the company and ask for clarification.

First of all, if you haven't authorized the send of this email, it is strongly recommended that you take a look at the "Terms & Conditions" of the website. Many links to web sites that offer email encryption and other defenses against unwanted mail are listed in the "Terms & Conditions" of the website.

While many may not explicitly state it, many will go to great lengths to assure their email recipients that they will never send them their private email address. Greater care should be taken to avoid sending to unknown others. Spam artists and other scammers are ever diligent in their quest to obtain the keys to your email account by parading as a financial institution or other authority.

If you are unsure whether or not the company is genuine, do the following:

1. Contact the company directly by phone and ask if they requested your email address.

2. Return the email to them with the header information still intact.

3. Read their privacy policy and terms of service again, in case there are any hidden clauses.

4. If you find any indication that websites may have stolen your email address, visit their site and report it to them.

5. Purchase a Whois tool from your domain name registrar or search for a Whois tool that can detect spoofs.

6. Perform a Whois search on your email address to see if anyone has incorrectly listed it as their own.

7. Encrypt your email address data and the name of your server.

8. Take precaution with the use of email, as some messages may be considered spam.

9. Lack of security measures at the web-server level, may open the door for unwanted visitors to your site.

10. Unknow 900,000+ users located in the Blacklist, may put your business at risk.